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There are many ways to get involved with School in the Cloud, from running your own SOLE to becoming a Granny or carrying out research with us.


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A useful guide to how to run your own SOLE. Our toolkit is free to use and adapt to your own environment through Creative Commons licence.


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School in the Cloud is learning at the edge of chaos; a place to come together to discover and explore self-organised learning (SOLE).


Big Questions


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A great Big Question will get your SOLE off to a flying start, but deciding what to ask is the hardest part! Children love questions with no easy answer.


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The Big Question

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Making money - Posted by Success4All


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Location: England



How many ways can you come up with to make money, just using the internet, without any sale of physical goods?

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How many ways can you come up with to make money, just using the internet, without any sale of physical goods?

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Internet | Money | sales

The Big Question

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Internet: Open, Free, Protected


  Author - School in the Cloud



How can you maintain our open and free Internet, yet at the same time protect users from abusive or harmful content?

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How can you maintain our open and free Internet, yet at the same time protect users from abusive or harmful content?

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Censorship | Digital Technology | Freedom of Speech | Human Rights | Internet | Social Media | Technology

The Big Question

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School in the Cloud: Working in Rural Areas


  Author - School in the Cloud



How Could School in the Cloud be made to work for the most remote rural areas that have no mains electricity or broadband?

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How Could School in the Cloud be made to work for the most remote rural areas that have no mains electricity or broadband?

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Broadband | Digital Technology | Education | Electricity | Innovation | Internet | Poverty | Rural Communities | School in the Cloud | SOLE

The Big Question

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Internet - how it works


  Author - School in the Cloud



How does the internet work?

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How does the internet work?

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Digital Technology | Internet | Technology

The Big Question

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Controlling the Internet


  Author - School in the Cloud



How do people control the Internet?

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How do people control the Internet?

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Computer Engineering | Internet | Technology

The Big Question

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Access to Internet during Exams


  Author - School in the Cloud



Should we give children access to the internet during exams?

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Should we give children access to the internet during exams?

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Children | Education | Exams | Internet | Learning | Pedagogy

The Big Question

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Speed of the Internet


  Author - Indigo Admin



Can you measure the speed of internet with a formula for speed as in regular physics?

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Can you measure the speed of internet with a formula for speed as in regular physics?

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Internet | Maths | Measurement | Speed | Technology

The Big Question

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The Internet - what it can and can't tell us


  Author - School in the Cloud



What can the internet not tell us and what can it never tell us?

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What can the internet not tell us and what can it never tell us?

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Internet | Knowledge

The Big Question

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Google


  Author - School in the Cloud



Why is google called Google?

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Why is google called Google?

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Google | Internet

The Big Question

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If Brains were Connected to the Internet


  Author - School in the Cloud



If our brains become connected to the internet (enhancing the speed of our intelligence), we live to be more than 120 years old, and most jobs can be done by machines, how will we spend our lives? What kind of worlds will we build?

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If our brains become connected to the internet (enhancing the speed of our intelligence), we live to be more than 120 years old, and most jobs can be done by machines, how will we spend our lives? What kind of worlds will we build?

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Brains | Futuristic | Humans | Internet | Science

jam_sandwich_feature How to make a jam sandwich, SOLE style

SOLE Central

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SOLE Central

How to make a jam sandwich, SOLE style


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Partner(s) - SOLE Central

  Location: Bedfordshire



If the average adult sat down to work out how to teach basic coding, they probably wouldn’t naturally think of a jam sandwich.

But that’s exactly what this SOLE group of home schoolers did with their presentation to computer science teachers.

Anna the (real life) robot was given a set of instructions to follow to make the sandwich, which may have resulted in a lot of mess, but certainly got the message across about how to teach the subject far more effectively than a textbook.

Jacqueline Emkes, an e-Learning consultant and part-time maths teacher,

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If the average adult sat down to work out how to teach basic coding, they probably wouldn’t naturally think of a jam sandwich.

But that’s exactly what this SOLE group of home schoolers did with their presentation to computer science teachers.

Anna the (real life) robot was given a set of instructions to follow to make the sandwich, which may have resulted in a lot of mess, but certainly got the message across about how to teach the subject far more effectively than a textbook.

Jacqueline Emkes, an e-Learning consultant and part-time maths teacher, runs SOLEs for home educated children at Biddenham International School and Sports College in Bedfordshire, UK.

They have been running since 2013, supported by the college and the local authority’s PLACE programme for children who are not in school but on the Elective Home Education (EHE) Register.

One of the biggest challenges Jacq faces is the diverse age range of her group – from eight to 12-years-old – which means she is often diverted from her original lesson plan. There are usually around 15-20 children, but the numbers fluctuate as families come and go.

“Inevitably ‘normal’ behaviour rules go out the window,” says Jacq. “Children are soon found scrolling the internet lying on the floor, under a desk, on top of a desk, perched on a table. Anything goes – it’s all learning! The children can move around freely, help other groups and indeed swap groups.”
Jacq’s SOLE makes good use of the safe social learning platform Makewaves where they can upload their work to create movies, pictures and stories to share with the group.

They are also encouraged to critique each other’s work (in a positive and helpful way, naturally!) and even family members and the college’s principal have been adding their own comments to help improve student’s work.

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Children | Computer Science | Education | Food | Human Behaviour | Internet | Jam | Robots | Sandwiches | Sanitation

Skyping with children - feature image Skyping with the children - Not always easy! by Jackie Barrow

SOLE Central

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SOLE Central

Skyping with the children - Not always easy! by Jackie Barrow


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Partner(s) - SOLE Central

  Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne



The Granny Cloud reaches out to groups of children across a range of different locations using Skype. It’s fantastic! If the connection is good, you can see each other, hear each other, send text messages, send files and links, share your screens with each other and take photos of each other. So the Grannies conduct sessions where they chat with the children, read stories, play games, make things, do quizzes, sing, dance, share jokes, pictures and video clips, search the internet and share findings. In fact all the sorts of activities that grandparents might share with their grandchildren or good teachers with their pupils.

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The Granny Cloud reaches out to groups of children across a range of different locations using Skype. It’s fantastic! If the connection is good, you can see each other, hear each other, send text messages, send files and links, share your screens with each other and take photos of each other. So the Grannies conduct sessions where they chat with the children, read stories, play games, make things, do quizzes, sing, dance, share jokes, pictures and video clips, search the internet and share findings. In fact all the sorts of activities that grandparents might share with their grandchildren or good teachers with their pupils.

NLSM 23Oct09 smiles all around

But what can’t you do over Skype? Well, you can’t always see how many children have joined the session. You can’t feel how hot, or cold or stuffy or dusty the room might be. You can’t sense the mood of the children or the group dynamics. You can’t know if they’ve been squabbling or joking before they came up to the screen.

You can’t judge the body language or the facial expressions with the same accuracy as you could if you were in the same room. You can’t tell whether the children are hungry or thirsty, tired, frightened, upset.

It’s difficult to assess over Skype whether the child who has just wandered away from the screen has lost interest because they can’t understand, needs the toilet, is feeling unwell or is feeling undermined by the bright, slightly pushy child who has taken control of the microphone.

You can’t always tell whether that long delay before any sort of answer to your last question is offered is because they have absolutely no idea what you are asking or whether in fact one of the children has gone over to another computer to search for the answer to relay to the child at the front.

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Children | English Language | Granny Cloud | Internet | Language | Learning Styles | Reading | Skype | Stories

got_sole_feature So you think you've got SOLE? Sugata Mitra explains the science behind it

SOLE Central

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SOLE Central

So you think you've got SOLE? Sugata Mitra explains the science behind it


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Partner(s) - SOLE Central

  Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne



Sugata recently appeared on BBC World Service’s The Forum programme to talk about SOLEs and his idea for school exams in the future. We thought you might like to hear some of what was discussed on this blog.

“It’s important to understand the sense in which I use the word ‘self organising system’,” says Sugata. “It’s not organisation of the self. I find increasingly that people mix it up with self-regulated or self-directed learning and that’s not what I’m talking about.

“A self organising system is basically a concept that comes out of maths and physics which is that if you allow a system to be chaotic then,

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Sugata recently appeared on BBC World Service’s The Forum programme to talk about SOLEs and his idea for school exams in the future. We thought you might like to hear some of what was discussed on this blog.

“It’s important to understand the sense in which I use the word ‘self organising system’,” says Sugata. “It’s not organisation of the self. I find increasingly that people mix it up with self-regulated or self-directed learning and that’s not what I’m talking about.

“A self organising system is basically a concept that comes out of maths and physics which is that if you allow a system to be chaotic then, under certain circumstances, you get spontaneous order.

“I think I’ve seen that happen with children quite accidentally; initially I had not a clue that was what was happening. Yet over the last 15 years, in instance after instance, I’ve seen groups of children who simply don’t know any English confronted with the internet in English and making sense of what they see.”

Sugata also talked to BBC host Bridget Kendall about how hole-in-the-wall developed into School in the Cloud in a way that would not have been possible before the Internet, and how it has changed the way children learn.

“When a group reads together they somehow read at much higher levels of comprehension than an individual child,” he explains. “This was not something I’d seen before. The limitations of reading in print means you can’t easily read the same book at the same time in a group, but you can on screen.

“We’ve seen instant amplification of comprehension – as soon as one stumbles, another one steps in to help, creating this spontaneous order.”

Sugata says that this instantaneous feedback from peers,

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BBC World Service | Children | Education | Internet | Learning | Maths | Physics

Phaltan School in the Cloud - feature image The 6th Learning Lab is Officially...Open!

TED Lab - Phaltan

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TED Lab - Phaltan

The 6th Learning Lab is Officially...Open!


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Partner(s) - TED Lab - Phaltan

  Location: Phaltan



Today we are delighted to celebrate the opening of our 6th learning lab which is located in Phaltan, a small town in Maharashtra, India. Since Sugata Mitra won the TED Prize in 2013, 5 similar environments have been opened in both India and the UK as part of the global experiment in self-organised learning; the final flagship site is due to open in Gocharan early next year.

Initiated by Newcastle University and TED Prize, this lab is the first one located in a school where English is taught as a subject alongside all the others. The language used throughout the school is Marathi,

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Today we are delighted to celebrate the opening of our 6th learning lab which is located in Phaltan, a small town in Maharashtra, India. Since Sugata Mitra won the TED Prize in 2013, 5 similar environments have been opened in both India and the UK as part of the global experiment in self-organised learning; the final flagship site is due to open in Gocharan early next year.

Initiated by Newcastle University and TED Prize, this lab is the first one located in a school where English is taught as a subject alongside all the others. The language used throughout the school is Marathi, which is the official language of Maharashtra state. “Imagine using an Internet where there is hardly anything at all in your mother tongue – that’s what it’s like for these children,” says Dr Suneeta Kulkarni, Research Director for School in the Cloud.

The new learning lab is specifically designed to facilitate SOLEs, where children collaborate to answer big questions using the internet. These child-focused learning sessions are fuelled by curiosity and discovery, providing children with the space and freedom to explore. It is located close to the school gates and overlooks the playground and residential area, so is easily visible to the local community.

Many lessons were learned from building the other learning labs and these have been taken into account during this construction, including the glass windows stopping at eye-level. “That kind of design where the glass is up to the ceiling is fine in the UK but there’s much more light here and it makes it difficult to see the screen – it also gets too hot!” explains Dr Kulkarni.

Connectivity, as with many of the more rural School in the Cloud sites, is one of the greatest challenges here and so a back-up dongle is being used in case the regular broadband fails.

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Children | Comprehension | English Language | Granny Cloud | Internet | Learning | Newcastle University | Phaltan | Self-organised Learning | TED Prize

The Granny Cloud on tour: first stop, London!


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Location: London



“The Granny Cloud could become to learning what Skype is to instantaneous video-conferencing.” – Prof Sugata Mitra

Anyone accidentally stumbling upon a gathering occurring just off Liverpool St in London last Saturday could have been forgiven for thinking they’d walked in on a reunion of old friends.

In fact, most of the people in that room – who had travelled from all over the UK and Europe to be there – had never actually met in ‘real life’, but had shared many hours together online, as part of the Granny Cloud*.

The Granny Gathering,

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“The Granny Cloud could become to learning what Skype is to instantaneous video-conferencing.” – Prof Sugata Mitra

Anyone accidentally stumbling upon a gathering occurring just off Liverpool St in London last Saturday could have been forgiven for thinking they’d walked in on a reunion of old friends.

In fact, most of the people in that room – who had travelled from all over the UK and Europe to be there – had never actually met in ‘real life’, but had shared many hours together online, as part of the Granny Cloud*.

The Granny Gathering, organised by Liz Fewings, was a day filled with food, laughter and ideas and the chance to chat with Newcastle University’s Prof Sugata Mitra about the School in the Cloud and how the ‘grannies’ are a vital part of its future.

Technology – the most challenging part of making the School in the Cloud work on a daily basis – was even on our side as we managed to have an excellent Skype connection with Suneeta Kulkarni, research director for the School in the Cloud, who joined us for the entire session from India.

From hearing about learning hairdressing (with truly hair-raising results!) and construction via the Internet in further education from PhD student Cathy Ellis (who is researching the use of SOLEs in this environment), to how children in the USA and Ghana come up with the same answer to a Big Question, there was plenty to discuss.

For example, how YouTube is bringing about a revolution in how we acquire skills. Sugata was imagining a future where retired lawyers and plumbers could be called upon online and raised the question whether this could be a natural extension of the Granny Cloud.

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Big Questions | Comprehension | Grannies | Granny Cloud | Internet | Learning | Newcastle University | Pedagogy | Self-organised Learning | Skype | Sugata Mitra | TED Talk