Join Our Community


get-involved

There are many ways to get involved with School in the Cloud, from running your own SOLE to becoming a Granny or carrying out research with us.


Download Toolkit


support

A useful guide to how to run your own SOLE. Our toolkit is free to use and adapt to your own environment through Creative Commons licence.


Read Our Story


listing-image-3

School in the Cloud is learning at the edge of chaos; a place to come together to discover and explore self-organised learning (SOLE).


Big Questions


noimage

A great Big Question will get your SOLE off to a flying start, but deciding what to ask is the hardest part! Children love questions with no easy answer.


Search Results

Sarah Leonard UK teacher writes in defence of 'evidence' for SOLE

SOLE Central

View Partner

SOLE Central

UK teacher writes in defence of 'evidence' for SOLE


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Partner(s) - SOLE Central

  Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne



In response to your article ‘Sugata Mitra – the professor with his head in the cloud’ Guardian (7th June 2016)

Dear Peter,

So, I am a teacher in my seventeenth year of teaching,

Read More

In response to your article ‘Sugata Mitra – the professor with his head in the cloud’ Guardian (7th June 2016)

Dear Peter,

So, I am a teacher in my seventeenth year of teaching,

Read more

KS2 | Sugata Mitra | Teaching | TED | The Guardian

SOLE NYC feature image What’s the code for New York?

SOLE NYC

View Partner

SOLE NYC, SOLE Central

What’s the code for New York?


  Author - School in the Cloud

  Partner(s) - SOLE NYC, SOLE Central

  Location: New York City



A leading kids’ coding expert recently lamented that teachers are making computer class ‘way too boring’. Well, he obviously hadn’t sat in on a SOLE Code session recently!

As part of international Hour of Code week, two SOLE classrooms 3,000 miles apart linked up for joint sessions where they not only tackled the Big Question: What is a computer bug? but they also bugged and debugged a lite version of the infamous Flappy Bird game.

“Creativity is key to successful coding,” explains Dr Anne Preston, who is part of the collaborative team at Newcastle University running these sessions.

Read More

A leading kids’ coding expert recently lamented that teachers are making computer class ‘way too boring’. Well, he obviously hadn’t sat in on a SOLE Code session recently!

As part of international Hour of Code week, two SOLE classrooms 3,000 miles apart linked up for joint sessions where they not only tackled the Big Question: What is a computer bug? but they also bugged and debugged a lite version of the infamous Flappy Bird game.

“Creativity is key to successful coding,” explains Dr Anne Preston, who is part of the collaborative team at Newcastle University running these sessions. “You can teach coding by getting children to sit in front of a computer on their own, but where’s the fun in that? By using self-organised learning, the children collaborate to devise questions they want to solve, and also come up with their own answers. That way, the learning really stays with them as it’s tailor-made for each different group.”

On Wednesday 9 December, children from Amberley Primary School near New York, North Tyneside, UK had the chance to learn more about computational thinking and develop their coding skills. They were working alongside fellow students in their more famous namesake SOLE NYC at John B Russwurm PS197 elementary school in Harlem, the location of Sugata’s Mitra’s latest TED SOLE research lab.

Dr Shaimaa Lazem, who leads the joint coding project between Newcastle University’s SOLE Central and Open Lab, was extremely pleased with how everything went. “The children collaborated really well,” she says. “They even thought of something we hadn’t considered, designing their own ice-breaker by gathering in front of the big screen and asking each other questions about Newcastle, New York, and a typical school day.”

During the follow-up SOLE session “What is a computer bug?” on the Friday,

Read more

Amberley Primary School | Coding | Flappy Bird Game | TED